Chicken Wire Memo Board (Bye-Bye Buck)

Do you remember a few weeks back when I bought that hideous framed print of the deer from the thrift store? I re-assured you that I bought “Buck” only for the frame, remember? You were really doubting me on that one, weren’t you? Are you ready to see what I did with it? 
I transformed it into a new memo board for my craft room! I actually found out from a reader that the deer print “is from Home Interiors, circa 1980’s. It is a reprint of original John Wayne owned.” Huh, who knew? Another reader told me her father had it when she was little! Maybe I should have left it alone? Nah!

Bye-bye Buck! I removed the backing, print and glass.

Hubby measured, cut and stapled chicken wire to the back. You can find chicken wire at your local hardware/home improvement store. It’s near the fencing supplies {outdoors at Home Depot or Lowes}.

I painted the frame with Olympic Heavy Cream and sprayed the chicken wire with a combination of Rust-Oleum Satin Metallics Oil-Rubbed Bronze and Aged Copper spray paints.

Then {of course} I distressed the paint with sandpaper. I had planned on being finished at this point, but I didn’t like the way it looked against the wall.

So I measured and cut a piece of fabric and hot-glued it to the back of the frame.

Much better! But it still needed a little something. I added some rosettes {two burlap and one of the same fabric} to the top left corner. You can find my rosette tutorial here.

I added some clothespins {which I think I will darken a bit with distress ink or stain} and my new memo board is complete! If only I could say the same about my craft room!
Don’t forget to enter the Trendy Trinket giveaway

How I Sew Drapes

I’ve told y’all before, I’m not a professional seamstress! Pretty much the only things I’ve made with my sewing machine are pillows and curtains. I like to figure things out on my own. I do not like to read directions, I do not like to follow patterns, I just don’t have the patience for them. I am the kind of person that just has to try, possibly fail, and try again to figure things out on my own. So my sewing, it’s probably not the “right” way, but I do it my way and it works. If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it, right? I had several inquiries asking how I made the drapes for Parker Reese’s nursery. I didn’t have a blog when I made those so I had no reason to photograph the process. However, I did make the new drapes for my new dining room {which, by the way, is just about finished}! So, if you dare continue, here is how I sew drapes. 
For me, the hardest part of this process is measuring and cutting the fabric. Seriously, I started to think maybe there was something wrong with my brain. It took me forever! I had to measure, and re-measure. Ugh! Basically, you want to measure your window and decide how long you want your drapes. I wanted to hang these high above the window and I wanted them to gather on the floor. {total length: 92 inches, width: 30 inches}
After cutting four equal pieces of fabric, I folded and pinned about one inch on each side of the fabric.
I do not iron my fold, I just secure with pins. The total width of the curtains after sewing was 28 inches. I do not add liner to my drapes. It’s an extra step that I don’t feel is necessary. I don’t use them to cover the windows, just to decorate. Plus, this fabric is thick enough that the light won’t shine through it and they won’t fade.
I used a sewing machine to stitch the sides of the panels. After the sides were sewn, I folded, pinned  and stitched the top {2 inches} and and bottom {1 inch} to make a length of 89 inches.

My original rods were in good condition and I really didn’t want to spend the money for new ones but I wanted them to be a little longer. So my genius hubby came up with a solution. He is really good at rigging things like this. He cut an old flag pole we had in the garage {which happened to be the exact thickness of the rod} and used a double-ended screw to fasten it to the existing rod. One problem – the color of the pieces didn’t match.

Two coats of my favorite spray paint, Krylon brushed nickel, and they were good as new. And I found drapery rings {Wal-mart for $6/pack} in the same color! Score!

Initially I wanted to sew pleats in the top of the panels, but I was afraid I would mess them up so I decided against it. Instead I created pleats by folding the fabric and securing with the drapery clips.

Yes, that is a chip clip helping to pleat my drapes! After I “pleated” and hung the drapes, I continued the folds down the fabric {securing with a chip clip} and I then used my steamer to press them.
Before:


After:

I am in love! I was a little worried that this fabric wouldn’t fit with the decor of the rest of my house, but I absolutely love it now that the drapes are up. LOVE it!  I hope to give you the dining room reveal next week!

Summer Porch Decor

It started with a chair from Goodwill that cost just $12. It reminded me of some chairs my parents had when I was little. It was in almost perfect condition. Even the paint looked good. It just needed to be cleaned. I kept walking but in the end, left the store with the chair.

I went from Goodwill to Home Depot to pick out the perfect color of  paint to fix this baby up. I left with  Krylon Bright Idea.

Two coats later, my pretty chair was good as new and a bright sunny yellow!
On to Hobby Lobby to find some things to add to my new chair.
A straw wreath, some fabric, buttons and yarn came home with me.

I already showed you my summer wreath tutorial a couple weeks ago. Besides the yellow paint, it was the inspiration for my summer porch makeover.

I had lots of extra fabric and a pretty yellow {but boring} chair. Hello, PILLOWS!

I added a simple square pillow and a monogrammed bolster pillow to complete my chair.
I’ve given you a full tutorial on how to make a monogrammed bolster pillow here.
Some bright {and of course, matching} flowers.
It ended with a welcoming porch that screams “Happy summer!”

Welcome to our home!

Recovering the Dining Room Chairs

Part of redecorating my dining room included recovering the dining chairs. Hubby and I purchased this set back when we bought our first house and I recovered them then with gold curtains I found at a discount store. Two panels were much cheaper than three yards of fabric so I thought, “Why not?” But over the past six years the fabric has become picked and snagged. Plus, it didn’t really match the new decor. What I would really like is a new dining table but I can’t really justify that since there is nothing wrong with the one I have. 
Solution? Recover the cushions for a like-new dining set.
This is really a very easy fix for any chair. All you need is fabric and a heavy duty staple gun. Here is what the chairs have been covered in for the past six years. The original fabric was like a twill or tweed. Not really sure to be honest. But it was odd for dining chairs and very informal which is why I re-covered them immediately after purchasing the set.

First you flip the chairs upside down and remove the screws securing the seat cushion to the wood. 
The cushion should easily pop out after the screws have been removed. {Some older chairs might need extra pressure applied if screws have rusted or corroded}.

Measure and cut your fabric about three inches longer on all sides than the cushion. {Longer if your cushion is  super thick.} Start with the front and back edges tightly wrapping fabric around the seat cushion and securing with heavy duty staples every couple of inches. Once the front and back have been secured, fold all four corners in a fashion similar to how  you would wrap a present, securing with staples. The hardest part is just pulling, folding and tucking to make sure it is tight and that there are no {or very few} obvious wrinkles and/or folds on the upper-side of the seat cushion. After you’ve finished you can pull and tug some of these wrinkles out.
Put the cushions back in the chair the same way you took them out.

And there ya go!
Okay, so this one has a few wrinkles which I have since gone back and smoothed out a little better. I was just trying to get a photo before it got too dark. 
There you have it. An easy fix for any old chair. 
I know I already showed you a picture of the paint color, but here it is finished!
LOVE! So bright, so fresh! I’m in the process of making the drapes, so stay tuned. . .

OH, one more thing!
Look what arrived on my doorstep this morning. . .

My new Silhouette SD package {cutting machine, heat transfer materials and a gift card for Silhouette downloads} that I won from Kim at Today’s Creative Blog!!!!! I’ve been watching out the window for this delivery for almost two weeks now. Like a kid at Christmas! Eeeeeek! Thanks Kim and the Silhouette team!

Decorating for Summer: Front Door Wreath

A couple of months ago I shared with you the baby girl wreath I made for my friend Cindi for her baby shower. Well since making the wreath for her, I’ve been wanting something similar for myself. And what better way to decorate my door for summer than with a summer rosette wreath?
Here’s how I did it. . .
You’ll need a straw wreath {I found mine at Hobby Lobby near the grapevine wreaths}, yarn, coordinating fabric, buttons and a hot glue gun.
To be honest with you, I don’t think I’ll EVER do the yarn part again. For my friend’s baby shower I wrapped the wreath with burlap fabric strips which was pretty simple. I like the way the yarn wreaths look but man, it was time consuming! I sat on my couch and wrapped the wreath for almost two hours! Seriously, it took the entire episode of American Idol to wrap this thing in yarn! Maybe it’s because I’m slow, maybe it’s because I’m a perfectionist, I don’t know. It took forever! Anyway, I taped the yarn to the plastic covering and started wrapping it around and around and around. I did three layers filling in the spaces as I went.

Next I made the flowers. I decided to use both rosettes and layered petal flowers for this wreath.Click here for photos and tutorials on making both these flowers. 
Once the flowers were finished I added the buttons to a few and arranged them around the wreath.

I used hot glue to secure the flowers and tied a grosgrain ribbon around the top to hang it.

And there ya go! My new summer wreath! 

Every Gal Needs a Cute Summer Clutch!

You must have a handbag for all seasons and occasions!
{I learned that from my mom}
It’s hard to believe that summer is right around the corner! When the theme, Summer Fun was announced for this week’s American Crafter competition, I had so many ideas running through my head. But in the end, I knew this one was “it!” I have a couple weddings coming up this summer and I could really use a new clutch. Well, it just so happened that last weekend I picked up this brown, patent leather vintage clutch for a buck {yes, $1} at a garage sale.
I had a vision, an idea, a plan, but had no idea HOW or even IF it would work. So during my weekly trip to Hobby Lobby, I  picked out some super cute summery fabric and crossed my fingers, hoping for the best.
It was actually easier than I thought it would be! I just kind of figured it out as I went. And I think it turned out FABULOUS! Here is a peak. . . 
Now, here is how I did it. . .
First, I measured the fabric and cut it to size. I applied Mod Podge to the patent leather and placed the fabric on top to cover the purse {leaving a 1/2-inch bare at the top}, pulling tightly and smoothing out any bubbles. 

Now this was the tricky part. . . the sides and the top. I had no idea how to make the folds and edges look clean. But I did it! I applied the Mod Podge to the purse and really just wrapped it like a present, tucking and folding until it looked clean. 
After the fabric was secure and the undercoat of MP was dry, I applied a generous coat of MP on top of the fabric. It worked! Now to figure out how to decorate it. I had a couple of ideas in mind so while it was drying, I made the flowers.
Rosettes: {on the left} Cut a strip of fabric 3-inches wide. The length will depend on how large you want the flowers {the longer the strip, the larger the flower}. I used lengths between 1 and 2 feet. Twist the fabric somewhat tightly and wrap it around and around in a spiral fashion, securing with hot glue on the under side every other circle.
Layered Petal Flowers: {middle} Cut several flowers with 4 petals using different fabrics and sizes. Layer fabric flowers, beginning with the largest, a few at a time, securing with hot glue in the center and pinching to create shape. Basically you will “build” this flower, layer upon layer.
Arrangement: {far right} I then arranged the rosettes underneath and put the petal flower on top in the center.
A little measuring, cutting, Mod Podging {if that’s even a word}, folding, twisting and rolling and I had a FABULOUS summer clutch to take with me to those weddings! 
My new summer clutch! 
It turned out even better than I thought it would! And Mod Podging the fabric to the patent leather worked like a charm! The best part? It cost less than $5! You can’t find a price like that at any department store!
Now if you like my new purse, please, please, pretty please head over to Nap Time Crafters to cast your vote for round 3. Voting starts Friday night and ends Sunday night, so hurry! Next week is the FINAL ROUND!  I hope to make it!!
I was featured at

A New (Seriously Homemade) Bulletin Board

 Yesterday I shared with you the new work table I put in Parker’s nursery in attempt to make it more of a “big boy” room without changing the decor. 
Yes, I love the table, and so does he, but I felt like it was missing something. Hmmmm, what does this little table need? Well, there definitely needs to be something to cover that big blank space between the table and the hanging plaques. But what?
I’ve got it!

The little work table needs a bulletin board! 

Problem:
I’m not going to the store, what do I have laying around the house to create something resembling a bulletin board? 
Solution:
I went up to my attic and found this empty frame. The glass had broken a while back and I just knew I could use this frame for something! {I really do have some hoarding tendencies, I think. In this case, those tendencies worked in my favor.} Good thing I saved it! And for the bulletin board, well, I just bought a box of diapers this week and the box was still in the garage!
And I still had lots of fabric leftover from the window treatments and pillows I made for his room. 
Let’s get started, shall we?!
First I measured the frame and cut two pieces from the box to fit snuggly inside the frame. I wanted to use both fabrics, so I cut one large piece for the bottom portion and a smaller one for the section at the top. 
Then I used my stapler {yep, a regular old stapler} to attach the fabric, wrapping it tightly around the edges.
I crisscrossed white grosgrain ribbon across the bottom board and secured it using a small dab of hot glue where the ribbon met the edge of the board. This secured the ribbons in place so I could flip the board over and wrap the ribbon around the edge, again using hot glue to secure it.

Here is what it looked like after I glued the ribbon in place. Something was missing. I needed buttons. I didn’t have enough matching buttons, so off to Hobby Lobby I went. Sigh. . . 
The trip to the store was worth it. The buttons are a really nice accent. I secured them using the hot glue gun. Now into the frame the fabric-covered cardboard went.
But wait, since this is going on the distressed table, I decided to use a little distress ink so they match.
And, I really wanted to add his name, so I used my best bud Cricut to cut some letters out of white card stock and just Mod Podged them to the fabric. Easy as that. 
And now Parker has a lovely bulletin board to go along with his big boy work table. 
{I took this photo when the Mod Podge was still drying. The white film has dried clear}

Now he needs to make some big boy artwork to hang on it!
And since I love telling y’all how much little I spend on my projects, this one is easy. I spent about $2 on buttons. So there you have it folks, a bulletin board for 2 bucks!